Changes to Anthology Workshop

Changes to Anthology Workshop

We have a brand new major anthology series launching in 2017 from WMG Publishing, so we made some changes to the anthology workshop. That major new series will have stories bought at the workshop as well as our ongoing Fiction River anthology series.

And we have a moderately new cast of editors since we wanted to change up things after three years with the same gang. The writers attending were starting to get us all figured out. (grin)

So if you were signed up for the Anthology workshop, you should have gotten a letter from me tonight. If you are interested in attending the workshop in late Feb and early March, the information is under the Coast Workshops tab above. Write me if you have questions.

I discovered there were two spots open as I was going through and sending out letters. Seems I had signed up two people twice. Ahh, well, a good time to catch that ten months ahead of the workshop. (grin)

 

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Patreon Supporters and Smith’s Monthly Subscribers

We got if figured out for starting the catching up of Smith’s Monthly through WMG. One issue will go out electronically on Monday, a second issue on Friday, and a third issue on the following Monday.

Going to get back to writing tomorrow night after working up at the store. It’s been eleven days without writing, so it’s time.

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Topic of the Night: Nothing tonight

Nothing tonight. I spent the entire night working in the store and then sending out letters.

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Totals For Year 3, Month 10, Day 13

Writing in Public blog streak… Day 968

— Daily Fiction: 00 original words. Fiction month-to-date: 00 words  

— Nonfiction: 00 new words. Nonfiction month-to-date total: 00 words 

— Blog Posts: 200 new words. Blog month-to-date word count: 7,400 words

— E-mail: 23 e-mails (not counting all the e-mails to workshop attendees because I sent the same letter). Approx. 900 original words.  E-mails month-to date: 305 e-mails. Approx. 18,900 words

— Covers Designed and Finished: 0. Covers finished month-to-date: 2 Covers

——–

You can support this ongoing blog at Patreon on a monthly basis. Not per post. Just click on the Patreon image. Extra stuff for different levels of support and I will be adding in more as time goes on. Thanks for your support.

Or you can just toss a tip into the tip jar with a single donation at PayPal. Either way, your support keeps me going at these crazy posts.

And thanks.
Oo4th_patreon_name

If you would like to leave a tip just hit Paypal.me/deanwesleysmith (Goes to WMG Publishing account, but I’ll get it just fine.)

Topic of the Night: Pulp Writers’ Abilities

Pulp Writers’ Abilities

I got a great question today about some of the basics the really prolific pulp writers did to be so productive. And how to go about finding out about a lot of their styles.

How I have learned about so many of the older pulp writers is by reading book about them in their own words, reading books about the era, and just finding anything I could to read about the pulp writers of the 1920s to 1950s.

A great first book to start is Frank Gruber’s The Pulp Jungle. Oh, trust me, you will realize how little you have given to be a writer after reading that. Great stuff about other pulp writers. Lester Dent, Frederick Faust, and many others. (Frank Gruber was a great pulp writer as well.)

Also, I learned a lot about the pulp writers because I was lucky enough when I came into the field to be able meet and talk with numbers of them.

And I also know some of the main modern pulp-speed writers as well.

So I got thinking after the question today about what all of the ones I have studied have in common that were very productive. What traits as writers they had similar because they were all very different men and women.

Productive?

What do I mean by productive? Basically, writing above a million words a year for years and years and years.

It is the years and years and years part that is the big eliminator in this question. Often writers would have a few good years and then just vanish for one reason or another. We mostly don’t remember them.

The ones we do remember all seemed to keep the pace up for a decade or more. That created a body of work that, for the most part, has made it down through time.

Work Patterns

Every productive pulp writer I have studied had a few work patterns in common. And they all seemed to just take most of these in stride, as if doing anything else would be just foolhardy.

1… They did regular page counts or word counts every day.

Usually seven days a week. Very few of them took time off regularly.

Frederick Faust (Max Brand and other names) did 18 pages a day every day of the week without vacation, for decades. Even when traveling with his large family. (About 4500 hundred words.)

2… They never rewrote anything. Any of them. They fixed typos on the manuscript and that was it. (As one of them said and I can’t remember who, “They don’t pay you to rewrite.”)

3… They all treated their writing as part of who they were. It was never work, just part of what they did every day.

The Main Key

However, over the years, I have come to the conclusion that they all had one ability in common that most modern writers don’t have.

4… They just let go of finished stories.

Now, I know that sounds simple and somewhat silly, but it is the driving thing for all of these productive writers. Once a story was finished and sold, it was gone. They always looked forward to the next story or novel.

They all had the natural ability to let go.

They typed at a decent pace on manual typewriters, they did one draft, they fixed typos, and they let the story go and moved on. No story had any more importance than any other story.

In my opinion, that is the hardest thing for writers to do, and most these days never attain it. But it is the secret to being extremely productive as a writer. Pulp-speed of a million words a year productive.

The enjoyment is in the writing of the story, the fun of the puzzle, the thrill of creating something. Once the story is over, they just move on to create a new story, have more fun with another puzzle, have another thrill of creating something.

Why this helps in production? Obvious first answer, at a writing speed of over a million words a year for years and years, you won’t remember older stories and you are producing so many, none of them much matter. Or have a difference from one to the other.

But I think it is more than that.

I think the really productive pulp-speed writers at a deep level don’t care about the finished product. They did the best they could while writing. That was all they could do, so them move on.

The lack of caring comes from the fact that real pulp-speed writers of any era love the process of writing. Some love it for the challenge, some love it for the creation, some love it for the fear.  So when a story is finished, all the things they love about writing are done.

So they move on to the next story.

They just let go.

Very few writers have that ability. That’s why there are so few pulp-speed writers and so many writers who want to produce more but never seem to be able to.

Have fun with the writing. It is the first step to picking up production as a writer.

Two Weeks and Counting Down

Two Weeks and Counting

Two weeks from yesterday the store will open. Tons of work left to do. But mostly things are falling into place. And it’s looking really cool, actually.

Today I filled shelves with DVDs, took boxes of clocks to other shelves, put non-skid strips on the outside stairs, and ran a bunch of errands. I did not climb on a ladder because I promised Kris I wouldn’t.

And yes, we have a wall of clocks. Not kidding. And a bunch we can’t find room to get out yet. And we have thousands of collector boxes as well, most we don’t have room to get out of the back room.

Second bookstore I have opened in my life, third comic shop, second toy store. Never had a clock and box shop before.

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June Workshop Update

Here we are in the middle of the month and still lots of room in all the June online workshops.  No surprise to me. I know it’s the time of great forgetting. But even if you don’t take a workshop or go to a conference or something to keep you focused on your writing a little, find something.

Challenge another writer to a small word count each week. And if one of you doesn’t make it, give the other bragging rights of some sort.

Time of great forgetting is in full force right now. You will be so much happier in late July or August if you keep just some focus on the writing through this time. Trust me on this. Restarting is a bitch.

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Patreon Supporters and Smith’s Monthly Subscribers

We got if figured out for starting the catching up of Smith’s Monthly through WMG. One issue will go out electronically on Monday, a second issue on Friday, and a third issue on the following Monday.

Going to get back to writing tomorrow night after working up at the store. It’s been eleven days without writing, so it’s time.

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Topic of the Night: Pulp Speed Writer’s Abilities

It’s above this post?

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Totals For Year 3, Month 10, Day 12

Writing in Public blog streak… Day 967

— Daily Fiction: 00 original words. Fiction month-to-date: 00 words  

— Nonfiction: 00 new words. Nonfiction month-to-date total: 00 words 

— Blog Posts: 1,000 new words. Blog month-to-date word count: 7,200 words

— E-mail: 16 e-mails. Approx. 600 original words.  E-mails month-to date: 282 e-mails. Approx. 18,000 words

— Covers Designed and Finished: 0. Covers finished month-to-date: 2 Covers

——–

You can support this ongoing blog at Patreon on a monthly basis. Not per post. Just click on the Patreon image. Extra stuff for different levels of support and I will be adding in more as time goes on. Thanks for your support.

Or you can just toss a tip into the tip jar with a single donation at PayPal. Either way, your support keeps me going at these crazy posts.

And thanks.
Oo4th_patreon_name

If you would like to leave a tip just hit Paypal.me/deanwesleysmith (Goes to WMG Publishing account, but I’ll get it just fine.)

Meetings, Store, and a Movie

Meetings, Store, and a Movie

Meetings all afternoon, then a couple hours of working in the new store, then off to see the new Avengers movie after a quick dinner.

And that is the summary of the day.

Two weeks from today the store will open. And yes, I will post pictures. It’s really cool-looking.

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Patreon Supporters and Smith’s Monthly Subscribers

We got if figured out for starting the catching up of Smith’s Monthly through WMG. One issue will go out electronically on Monday, a second issue on Friday, and a third issue on the following Monday.

Going to get back to writing. It’s been eleven days without writing, so it’s time.

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Topic of the Night: Amazon Video Direct

Well, they announced the start of this service, sort of going against YouTube the other day, without much fanfare. This might be a game-changer from what I can tell so far.

Anyone investigated this deeply so far?

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Totals For Year 3, Month 10, Day 11

Writing in Public blog streak… Day 966

— Daily Fiction: 00 original words. Fiction month-to-date: 00 words  

— Nonfiction: 00 new words. Nonfiction month-to-date total: 00 words 

— Blog Posts: 100 new words. Blog month-to-date word count: 6,200 words

— E-mail: 12 e-mails. Approx. 700 original words.  E-mails month-to date: 266 e-mails. Approx. 17,400 words

— Covers Designed and Finished: 0. Covers finished month-to-date: 2 Covers

——–

You can support this ongoing blog at Patreon on a monthly basis. Not per post. Just click on the Patreon image. Extra stuff for different levels of support and I will be adding in more as time goes on. Thanks for your support.

Or you can just toss a tip into the tip jar with a single donation at PayPal. Either way, your support keeps me going at these crazy posts.

And thanks.
Oo4th_patreon_name

If you would like to leave a tip just hit Paypal.me/deanwesleysmith (Goes to WMG Publishing account, but I’ll get it just fine.)

Another Workshop and Store Day

Another Workshop and Store Day

 

I’m going to make this very short since I did a topic the last couple of nights people can get caught up on. I need to rest my eyes after a full day of workshop work.

And I got a ton done in the new store, including licenses with the city, signs, new grid-wall up, new lights on the ceiling, and stuff like that. Opening in two weeks. Oh, my…

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Patreon Supporters and Smith’s Monthly Subscribers

I got the files today for another volume of Smith’s Monthly, so in the next few days the two issues should go out. And then next week a third issue. Paper subscribers you will get all three in one package. Just what you need, 200,000 words plus of my fiction in one envelope. (grin)

Working on getting the magazine back on cover date. After this it will end up with me getting back to writing. I hope to have the issues caught up by the time I do the Stories from July Take Two.

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Topic of the Night

Nothing tonight.

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Totals For Year 3, Month 10, Day 10

Writing in Public blog streak… Day 965

— Daily Fiction: 00 original words. Fiction month-to-date: 00 words  

— Nonfiction: 00 new words. Nonfiction month-to-date total: 00 words 

— Blog Posts: 100 new words. Blog month-to-date word count: 6,100 words

— E-mail: 39 e-mails. Approx. 3,900 original words.  E-mails month-to date: 254 e-mails. Approx. 16,700 words

— Covers Designed and Finished: 0. Covers finished month-to-date: 2 Covers

——–

You can support this ongoing blog at Patreon on a monthly basis. Not per post. Just click on the Patreon image. Extra stuff for different levels of support and I will be adding in more as time goes on. Thanks for your support.

Or you can just toss a tip into the tip jar with a single donation at PayPal. Either way, your support keeps me going at these crazy posts.

And thanks.
Oo4th_patreon_name

If you would like to leave a tip just hit Paypal.me/deanwesleysmith (Goes to WMG Publishing account, but I’ll get it just fine.)

Topic of the Night: Some Costs of Short Fiction Publishing

Some Costs of Short Fiction

In the old days, meaning ten years ago, we counted the price of selling short fiction in the cost of envelopes and postage. Not a small cost, actually. And printer ink and paper.

Now submissions are electronic with no costs other than the ability to deal with rejection and the wait for an editor to read your work. Actually, in this new world, the wait is the worst part since things are done so quickly these days.

So what are the indie publishing costs of what I described yesterday in trying to make a living with your short fiction?

Office Costs

Most of the costs of your office are what are called “set costs.” Those are costs that you experience regularly, such as a percentage of your mortgage payment for your writing office, a percentage of your power bill, your internet cost, your web site costs, and so on.

You also have some office expenses, such as when you buy a new computer or printer or paper or ink or a new desk or office chair. Those are expenses.

So set costs and expenses. How much are they? That will vary from person to person, situation to situation. But if you are going to be making a living with your short fiction, you need to treat everything like a business.

And early on, if you are smart and good with costs and expenses, you should never have to pay taxes on your writing money. In the business online workshop, Kris and I talk about when to change business structure and such to not pay so much in taxes.

Production Costs

This was the area I got three questions about today. And this area I can add in some pretty clear costs here.

Copyediting costs: These will vary, but for a short story of about 5,000 words you should be able to get a good copyedit on your manuscript for about $100.00.

Art Costs: At most of the online art sites, you should be able to buy a license to some cover art for anywhere from $15.00 to $30.00. If you are putting more than one piece of art on a cover, this total will go up.

Adobe Creative Suite: You will need this for InDesign and Photoshop at least. Worth the $50 per month, so turn it into a set cost for your office.

ISBN: You do not need an ISBN for your short stories in electronic, but you would want one on the paper version.  For a short story, buy the $10.00 ISBN from CreateSpace so you can put your own publisher name on it.

So moving the set cost of Adobe Creative Suite back to office costs, then per story you will be spending about $125 to $150 to get your story into print. The big part of that is the copyediting.

But one thing to remember. These costs are one-time costs. Your story can earn for years and years and years. Key to remember.

And I am not counting your time to write the story or to produce the story. Normally I would, but wanted to keep this simple this time.

Also, when you put the story into the collection, it does not have to be copyedited again. So for collections, your cost would only be from $25 to $40 per collection. As per last night’s discussion, you will make about $4.00 per sale of a collection, so you have your entire production costs back in ten sales.

Another Way of Thinking About Costs

Take your total costs for producing a short story. Include a percentage of your office costs.  Say you have about $300 in office set costs per month and you do 15 short stories in a month, you have per story a cost of about $20 set costs, plus the $150 for the production costs, giving you an investment in a story of $170.

Yes, I did say investment. You have created an income property.

So don’t think about how soon you can get the production costs back. Instead think of the $170 as if you put it into a long-term investment account.

So those of you who have 401K and savings and other investments, you know a 10% annual return on your money is pretty darned good.

So what do you need to get the $170 investment earning 10% annually?

$17.00 in income per year from the story. Or about 9 sales of the story in an entire year (at $2.00 per sale) will get you above a 10% return on the investment.

9 sales. In a year. From all the different places to sell.

Yeah, I know, applying real business and investment thinking to publishing hurts sometimes.

Hoped that answered some of the production cost questions. I think of the costs as production costs right up to the point when the story is done and the cover and such is done. Then, I switch my thinking to investment. I have invested the money I spent to produce that story in my future.

Many of you with day jobs do this with your retirement accounts. Why not think of your writing in the same fashion? Takes a ton of pressure off the sales.

And puts low sales of a story a month into real perspective.

A Side Story

Last year I had a nonfiction book earn me a 2,700% annual return on my investment. Blog posts turned into a book and the book was in a successful bundle as well as having good sales through all the sites.

Now I expect that same book to still have a fantastic rate of annual return on investment this year. Maybe over 100%.  And who knows, it might maintain that kind of massive return on original investment for years.

Investors in stock or bonds would kill for those rates of return.

We create property, folks. I like to think of each story as a house in a subdivision that I lease out. That nonfiction book was an expensive piece of property I bought real cheap. (grin)

Have fun.

Workshop and Store Day

Workshop and Store Day

Monday started off as most of my Mondays start, with me running errands all over town. Two banks, mail, our original store, locksmith, credit card machine people, and so on.

Finally got settled back in at WMG offices around 5 p.m. and worked on workshop stuff.

Home to cook dinner around 7:30, then back to the office to work on more workshop stuff, as well as work upstairs in getting the new store ready to open. That is just far too much fun.

Home around midnight to watch The Voice, then in here to do the assignments. This is a crossover week, so finishing up the April workshops and starting on the May workshops.

I got all that done around 4 a.m., wrote the topic on costs and am now here.

Plan is that I will be back writing finally on Thursday. We’ll see how that works out. (grin)

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Patreon Supporters

I got the files today for a volume of Smith’s Monthly, so tomorrow I should have them to you. And then later in the week I will send another issue. And then next week a third issue.

Working on getting the magazine back on cover date. After this it will end up with me getting back to writing. I hope to have the issues caught up by the time I do the Stories from July Take Two.

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September Historical Workshop has Started

That’s right, the September Historical, Time Travel, and Alternate History coast workshop e-mail group has started up. If you are signed up and didn’t get a letter from me, let me know.

All June online workshops still have room.

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Topic of the Night

I got some questions about the production costs of the short stories I suggested last night. The answer and more is above this post.

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Totals For Year 3, Month 10, Day 9

Writing in Public blog streak… Day 964

— Daily Fiction: 00 original words. Fiction month-to-date: 00 words  

— Nonfiction: 00 new words. Nonfiction month-to-date total: 00 words 

— Blog Posts: 1,300 new words. Blog month-to-date word count: 6,000 words

— E-mail: 36 e-mails. Approx. 3,100 original words.  E-mails month-to date: 215 e-mails. Approx. 12,800 words

— Covers Designed and Finished: 0. Covers finished month-to-date: 2 Covers

——–

You can support this ongoing blog at Patreon on a monthly basis. Not per post. Just click on the Patreon image. Extra stuff for different levels of support and I will be adding in more as time goes on. Thanks for your support.

Or you can just toss a tip into the tip jar with a single donation at PayPal. Either way, your support keeps me going at these crazy posts.

And thanks.
Oo4th_patreon_name

If you would like to leave a tip just hit Paypal.me/deanwesleysmith (Goes to WMG Publishing account, but I’ll get it just fine.)

Topic of the Night: Making a Living Writing Short Fiction

Can You Make a Living Writing Only Short Fiction?

Every year or so I look at this topic once again, do the math, see if anything has changed over the last couple of years.

And now, here in May 2016, things have changed some, but in my opinion it would still be possible to make a decent living writing only short fiction.

Why do I like this topic? Actually, because I love short fiction, meaning any story under around 10,000 words. I love reading it and I love writing it. And doing this exercise is fun for me, even though no one will ever follow this path.

Besides, I am a pulp writer at heart and a lot of pulp writers made a good living, if not great living, writing short fiction for the pulps.

So here we go once again. Caution, some math ahead. And some things you might not want to hear.

What is a Decent Living?

To figure out if it is possible, I suppose we need to set a number here as to a decent living. To make things easier, I’m just setting a number of $48,000 per year.

That’s $4,000 per month average over a year’s time. Decent living in many places, low for others. But for this exercise, let’s go with it.

(I personally hate it when my writing income gets under six figures, but that’s just my personal level.)

Also, I am not saying it would be possible to make a living with short fiction after only one year. But clearly it would after five or six years. And every year after that as well if you kept writing.

Income from a Single Short Story??

Almost impossible to give a set income for a single short story. So not really going to try. I have made over $10,000 each on a couple short stories and I am sure I have a couple recent short stories that have been lucky to make me $100 so far.

So I’m going to come at this from a different direction. And then talk in general numbers.

Production Speed

Now, those who have been around here for a time know that last July I wrote 32 short stories. About 110,000 words of short fiction.

Do I think anyone could do what Bradbury did for a time and write a story a day like I did in July? Sure, very possible. If I could do it, anyone could.

But would it be possible to do that for an entire year?

Not likely. Life issues, or life rolls as we like to call them, such as sickness, emergencies, family problems and so on would just not much allow that.

So if you did nothing with your life but get up in the morning and write short fiction, how many stories could you produce in a year?

Got to take into account you would also be indie publishing these titles at some point along the process, so there is time there to do covers and such. I’ll talk about the methods below.

And some stories are just going to run longer.

So I think it would be safe to say a full-time short story writer could easily do 15 short stories a month for a year. That’s not even half pulp speed.

In one year at that rate you would produce 180 short stories.

At the end of five years you would have produced about 900 short stories.

Keep those numbers in mind.

(And keep in mind that 900 short stories is far more than most writers will every write in their entire lifetimes.)

What Do You Need in Skills?

— A love, passionate love of short fiction and the form of short fiction in all genres.

— Ability to do your own covers.

— Ability to layout your own paper books.

— Ability to generate your own clean epub files.

— A couple good copyeditors who would charge reasonable rates.

— A stunningly good organizational system.

— An ability to keep learning craft.

— A simple but solid bookkeeping system for both tracking sales and tracking the money.

— The mindset to sell your work everywhere in the world in all sorts of forms.

— The ability to write clean first drafts without rewriting.

— The ability to write short fiction in many different genres. As well as create series in short fiction. (I have five or six different short story only series, plus 37 Poker Boy short stories.)

So, think you can do or learn how to do all of the above? If so, then to what you do with each story when finished.

The Path of a Single Short Story

Story Done!

First, send the story to a major market, meaning a market that does the following:

— Pays 5 cents per word and up.

— Only licenses from you what they need and nothing more for a short period of time.

— Reverts your story to you for your use within one year after publication. (And preferably, the place you sold it to keeps a non-exclusive right on your story and keeps it in print as advertising for your other work.)

Keep the story in the mail for one year or until you run out of high-paying markets. (I said this was going to five or six years remember?)

And yes, I know not all stories will be suitable for mailing. Romance and western markets are rare for short stories.

Once the story is either returned to you or you run out of markets or a year goes past without a sale, you do the following with the story.

— Indie publish it stand-alone electronic. Sale price is $2.99 electronic.

— Indie publish it stand-alone paper. Paper Price is $4.99

— Get the story combined in a theme collection of nine other stories. Price on those ten-story collections is usually $5.99 electronic and $12.99 paper.

The Math

Let’s say you have a fantastic sell-through to major markets and are learning your craft and getting better and better. So say you sell to a paying market one out of 20 stories the first year.

Stories sold average 5,000 words. You sales average 6 cents per word, so about $300 per story. You wrote 180 stories so you sold 9 of them, which gets you $2,700 for the year.

Year five: If you keep doing this, keep getting stories out there, you will be a major writer for numbers of publications and be selling far more than 9 of your stories per year. Safely you would selling upwards of 50 stories or more per year.  That’s 50 x $300 = $15,000 per year in the 5th year just from sales to magazines.

Also, realize, if you are doing that, by the fifth year, the promotion and advertising for your indie books will have climbed, but not going to take that into account here. Going to keep sales on the bottom at average of one sale per story per month.

Now to the Indie side of things.

At the end of the second year, you have 180 stories up. Say each story sells 1 copy per month. AVERAGE. Some will sell more, some won’t sell at all.

So at about $2.00 profit (both paper and electronic) per sale, you get $360 per month.

Remember, this is from all sources, all outlets around the planet. Every tiny trickle of money does add up.

So that’s $4,300 with 180 stories up.

With 180 stories, you would have 18 collections. Each sale of a collection would make you about $4.00, and you might sell one copy of each collection somewhere in the world every month.

So that’s $4.00 x 18 = $72 per month or about $850 per year. (rounding)

Summary

Now, taking those numbers, move to the end of the fifth year or early into the sixth year.

You would be making about $4,200 on collections at a base rate. ($850 x 5)

You would be making about $21,500 per year on single sales. ($4,300 x 5)

You would be making about $15,000 per year from magazine sales.

Total would be $40,700 for the year.

So at the end of five years, writing 15 stories per month for that time, you would not quite be to what I figured was a decent living wage, but you would make the $48,000 by the end of the 6th year.

Extras

Keep in mind, with this kind of production, and sales, you would never be on any bestseller lists. Your author ranking would be very low on Amazon, and all that other silly crap we hear so much about. You would only be averaging one sale per story per month across thirty different online markets.

But a ton of extra money would be starting to pour in after the fifth year of this kind of production. Not only would you be getting constant requests for reprints, but constant overseas sales (no you do not need an agent… Get Douglas Smith’s book on how to sell short fiction to the thousands of overseas markets and follow his blog. You can find him at www.smithwriter.com)

You would also be getting a lot of invites into anthologies (because of the sales in the paying markets). And you would be getting interest and money from Hollywood because they would be finding your work.

And you would have a fantastic inventory to do all sorts of promotions and other activities.

In Conclusion

Yes, it is possible to make a living writing short fiction.  My gut sense is that my numbers, if you actually did maintain that production pace, are very, very conservative. Discovery comes from products that can be found.

If you could produce 900 short stories in five years, sell numbers of them to paying markets, and get every story up live online and in paper, you could do it.

Do I think anyone I know is capable of this? Sure. I could do it easily.

And I know numbers of writers who could as well.

Will anyone do this? Nope.

But it sure is fun for me to talk about once every few years.

Just think of it as a way to keep an open mind to all the millions of possibilities of this new world of publishing.

 

Fantastic Bundle

Fantastic Bundle

I am in this fantastic new bundle from BundleRabbit. My novel Heaven Painted as a Poker Chip, which is the first novel in my Ghost of a Chance series, set in the Poker Boy universe.

Plus there are eleven other great books in this bundle. Worth it on this one folks. Just click on the image to go directly to BundleRabblit to check into all the books.

Full Originality Workshop up for Free on YouTube

That’s right. All six weeks.

So here is the first session of the second week for this Saturday night. And if you haven’t, start from the first video the first week. Makes a ton more sense that way. And do the assignments for yourself to help in that aspect as well.

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Patreon Supporters

You all will be getting three Smith’s Monthly volumes in quick order this month. First one on Monday or Tuesday.

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September Historical Workshop has Started

That’s right, the September Historical, Time Travel, and Alternate History coast workshop e-mail group has started up. If you are signed up and didn’t get a letter from me, let me know.

All June online workshops still have room.

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Totals For Year 3, Month 10, Day 8

Writing in Public blog streak… Day 963

— Daily Fiction: 00 original words. Fiction month-to-date: 00 words  

— Nonfiction: 00 new words. Nonfiction month-to-date total: 00 words 

— Blog Posts: 1,500 new words. Blog month-to-date word count: 4,700 words

— E-mail: 38 e-mails. Approx. 2,800 original words.  E-mails month-to date: 179 e-mails. Approx. 9,700 words

— Covers Designed and Finished: 0. Covers finished month-to-date: 2 Covers

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You can support this ongoing blog at Patreon on a monthly basis. Not per post. Just click on the Patreon image. Extra stuff for different levels of support and I will be adding in more as time goes on. Thanks for your support.

Or you can just toss a tip into the tip jar with a single donation at PayPal. Either way, your support keeps me going at these crazy posts.

And thanks.
Oo4th_patreon_name

If you would like to leave a tip just hit Paypal.me/deanwesleysmith (Goes to WMG Publishing account, but I’ll get it just fine.)

 

Entire Originality Workshop Now On YouTube

Originality Workshop Completely On YouTube

All six weeks plus most assignments and responses to the assignments are now on YouTube.

The hope is that the word will start getting out about these online workshops a little bit. We limit them to just five writers per workshop each month (except for the new ones), so I actually get to help people in each workshops if they need it or want it. And two workshops in May ended up with no one in them. Makes it a ton easier on me, but not the reason we are doing these workshops.

I honestly think the 14 or 15 active workshops we have now are what I would have wanted when coming into writing. And the classic workshops are pretty good as well.

So here is the first session of the second week for this Saturday night. And if you haven’t, start from the first video the first week. Makes a ton more sense that way. And do the assignments for yourself to help in that aspect as well.

——–

Patreon Supporters

You all will be getting three Smith’s Monthly volumes in quick order this month. First one on Monday or Tuesday.

—————

September Historical Workshop has Started

That’s right, the September Historical, Time Travel, and Alternate History coast workshop e-mail group has started up. If you are signed up and didn’t get a letter from me, let me know.

—————

Totals For Year 3, Month 10, Day 7

Writing in Public blog streak… Day 962

— Daily Fiction: 00 original words. Fiction month-to-date: 00 words  

— Nonfiction: 00 new words. Nonfiction month-to-date total: 00 words 

— Blog Posts: 200 new words. Blog month-to-date word count: 3,200 words

— E-mail: 17 e-mails. Approx. 400 original words.  E-mails month-to date: 141 e-mails. Approx. 6,900 words

— Covers Designed and Finished: 0. Covers finished month-to-date: 2 Covers

——–

You can support this ongoing blog at Patreon on a monthly basis. Not per post. Just click on the Patreon image. Extra stuff for different levels of support and I will be adding in more as time goes on. Thanks for your support.

Or you can just toss a tip into the tip jar with a single donation at PayPal. Either way, your support keeps me going at these crazy posts.

And thanks.
Oo4th_patreon_name

If you would like to leave a tip just hit Paypal.me/deanwesleysmith (Goes to WMG Publishing account, but I’ll get it just fine.)

 

My Newsletter Sign-Up



Current Bundle

Bundles: A great way to discover new writers and read some of my novels at the same time.

So if you want to read my novel HEAVEN PAINTED AS A POKER CHIP, you can get it in a bundle with eleven other novels from other writers from Bundlerabbit. Click on image to go to the bundle.

Smith’s Monthly Subscriptions

Smith's Monthly, an original fiction magazine featuring every month a full novel, short fiction, serial adventures, and nonfiction now available for subscriptions.

And twenty-six of them now exist... Amazing, huh? And hard to hold. Here I am holding the first five...

$6.99 electronic and $12.99 trade paper editions are available at your local bookseller. All paper subscription copies are signed. For more information, just click on the cover.

ISSUES IN ORDER

Online Workshop Schedule

These are the starting dates of upcoming online workshops. Limited to twelve writers. All have openings unless I say closed below. For sign-up and more information about each workshop, click the Online Workshop tab at the top of the page.

Class #51… June 6th … The Business of Writing
Class #52… June 6th … Character Voice/Setting
Class #53… June 6th … Author Voice
Class #54… June 6th … Ideas into Stories
Class #55… June 7th … Teams in Fiction
Class #56… June 7th … Depth in Writing
Class #57… June 7th … Plotting With Depth
Class #58… June 8th … Writing Fiction Sales Copy
Class #59… June 8th … Writing and Selling Short Stories
Class #60… June 8th … Advanced Depth

Class #1… July 11th … Author Voice
Class #2… July 11th … How to Write Thrillers
Class #3… July 11th … Adding Suspense to Your Writing
Class #4… July 11th … Plotting With Depth
Class #5… July 12th … Character Development
Class #6… July 12th … Depth in Writing
Class #7… July 12th … Advanced Character and Dialog
Class #8… July 13th … Cliffhangers
Class #9… July 13th … Pacing Your Novel
Class #10... July 13th … Teams in Fiction

Class #11… Aug 8th … The Business of Writing
Class #12… Aug 8th … Character Voice/Setting
Class #13… Aug 8th … Adding Suspense to Your Writing
Class #14… Aug 8th … Ideas into Stories
Class #15… Aug 9th … Teams in Fiction
Class #16… Aug 9th … Depth in Writing
Class #17… Aug 9th … Plotting With Depth
Class #18… Aug 10th … Writing Fiction Sales Copy
Class #19… Aug 10th … Writing and Selling Short Stories
Class #20… Aug 10th … Advanced Depth

Sign-up and more information under Online Workshops tab at the top of the page.

Classic Workshops

You can sign up for these and start at any point. They are the regular workshops, only you don't send in the homework and you can take them as fast or as slow as you would like.

They are half the price of a regular six week workshop.

Classic Workshops offered.

Making a Living... Classic
Productivity... Classic
Discoverability... Classic
Writing in Series... Classic
Genre Structure... Classic
Career... Classic

Lecture Series

More information on these lectures under the Lecture Series Tab above.

#1... Heinlein's Rules... Dean Wesley Smith 15 videos... $75.00

#2... Read Like a Writer... Kristine Kathryn Rusch... 8 videos... $50.00

#3... How to Write a Short Story: The Basics... Kristine Kathryn Rusch.... 7 videos... $50.00

#4... Writer's Block and Procrastination... Dean Wesley Smith... 8 videos... $50.00

#5... Carving Time Out for Your Writing... Dean Wesley Smith.... 8 videos... $50.00

#6... How to Research for Fiction Writers... Kristine Kathryn Rusch.... 14 videos... $75.00

#7... Pen Names: Help With the Decision... Dean Wesley Smith.... 10 videos... $50.00

#8... Motivation: Starting Easier and Writing More... Dean Wesley Smith.... 9 videos... $50.00

#9... Practice: The Attitude and Methods of Practice in Fiction... Dean Wesley Smith.... 10 videos... $50.00

#10... Master Plot Formula: How and Why It Works Today... Dean Wesley Smith.... 9 videos... $50.00

#11... Prolific Lecture: How to Become a Prolific Fiction Writer... Dean Wesley Smith.... 10 videos... $50.00

#12... The Stages of a Fiction Writer: How to Know Where You Are In Learning and How To Move Upward... Dean Wesley Smith.... 11 videos... $50.00

#13... Starting Writing. Or Restarting Your Writing... Dean Wesley Smith.... 9 videos... $50.00

#14... Endings: How to Write Them and Understand What Makes a Good Ending... Dean Wesley Smith.... 9 videos... $50.00

#15... Audio Narration Lecture... Jane Kennedy.... 9 audio lectures... $50.00

#16... Your Writing as an Investment Lecture... Dean Wesley Smith.... 9 videos... $50.00

#17... How to Get Your Books into Bookstores Lecture... Dean Wesley Smith.... 10 videos... $50.00

#18... How to Think Like a Science Fiction Writer Lecture... Kristine Kathryn Rusch....11 videos... $50.00

#19... Why Some Books Sell More Than Other Books... Dean Wesley Smith.... 9 videos... $50.00

#20... How to Write a Page Turning Novel or Story: Basics and Tricks ... Dean Wesley Smith.... 8 videos... $50.00

#21... The Basics of Designing Science Fiction Covers ... Allyson Longueira .... 8 videos... $50.00

#22... The Basics of Designing Mystery, Cozy, or Thriller Covers ... Allyson Longueira .... 8 videos... $50.00

#23... Paying the Price: A Working Writer's Mindset ... Dean Wesley Smith.... 10 videos... $50.00

#24... Writing into the Dark: The Tricks and Methods of Writing Without an Outline... Dean Wesley Smith... 12 videos... $50.00

#25... Reviews: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly... Dean Wesley Smith... 10 videos... $50.00

#26... Organization... Allyson Longueira... 8 videos... $50.00

#27... Confidence... Dean Wesley Smith... 10 videos... $50.00

#28... Stories to Novels... Dean Wesley Smith... 9 videos... $50.00

My Publisher

WMG Publishing Inc. is now my major publisher of all my coming novels, collections, and short stories.

Support This Blog On Patreon

I now have a Patreon page with some nifty rewards for your monthly support.

Just click on the image to go to my new Patreon page.