Writing in Public: Year 2, Month 6, Day 20

Year 2, Month 6, Day 20 of this Writing in Public challenge.

Got back to writing just fine tonight. I didn’t do a lot, but got a new novel started.

Rolled out around noon today, early than I should have, and ran all over town doing errands, banking, and such. Finally got to my office in WMG Publishing around four to work on formatting Smith’s Monthly.

Then home at 6:30 for the standard nap with the white cat, dinner, news, and dishes. Then in here to do the final work on putting together the new workshop. I didn’t last long since I was so tired and around 10:30 I headed for my reading chair to rest and basically passed out for an hour.

Staggered to the television with Kris at 11:30 to watch something to try to wake up, but by 1:30 a.m. no luck, so another thirty minute nap helped.

Finally got in here around 2 a.m. and managed to finish up the post at the top about the new workshop. That will be crammed full of more information than you can even imagine, not counting a free lecture and a free book. The book and lecture will just add to the information in the workshop. You will need to listen to the lecture and read the book to get everything you can from the workshop.

Then around 2:45 I headed to my writing computer after brushing the white cat. I had no idea what I wanted to write, so looked at my title sheets I use to build titles and trigger something and I came up with Bone Tunnel. And even though that’s not a poker term, so I’ll have to figure out something else later, the title made an image flash into my mind and I fired up typing a new Cold Poker Gang novel.

With one break, I managed 1,600 words before coming back over here to this computer at 5 a.m. to do this blog. So good start on a new novel.

Topic of the Night: Our Workshops

As I was adding in the description of the new workshop to the main workshop page here under the tab above and also on the workshop web site (www.wmgpublishingworkshops.com), I realized that Kris and I have finally almost got what we sort of set out to do with these workshops.

Basically, we wanted to build a series of workshops that almost any writer with any interest or craft need could find help with.

So now we have workshops that work together in a wonderful fashion.

For example, the Depth workshop, the Character Voice workshop, and the Pacing workshop are all high level craft workshops you can take in any order. All three are challenging workshops.

The new Discoverability workshop works perfectly with the Making a Living workshop and the Productivity workshop.

Ideas and Genre Structure and Cliffhanger workshops all work well together.

And then the “How To” workshops fit together. Short Story workshop, Thriller workshop, Science Fiction workshop, and Series workshop.

Anyway, just thought I would point that out. Kind of nifty how the group of workshops are coming together.

And I am excited about the Discoverability workshop. It might have three times the information of any workshop we have done before.

And good to be back writing fiction.

——–

Totals For Year 2, Month 6, Day 20

— Daily Fiction: 1,600 original words. Fiction month-to-date: 37,500 words  

— Nonfiction: 00 new words. Nonfiction month-to-date total: 2,500 words

— Blog Posts: 1,600 new words. Blog month-to-date word count: 13,150 words

— E-mail: 15 e-mails. Approx. 500 original words.  E-mails month-to date: 662 e-mails. Approx.14,900 words

— Covers Designed and Finished: 0. Covers finished month-to-date: 1 Covers

For projects finished in the first year and links to the posts, click on the Writing in Public tab above.

For projects finished this month and where you can read them, click continue reading below.

You can support this ongoing blog at Patreon on a monthly basis. Not per post. Just click on the Patreon image. Extra stuff for different levels of support and I will be adding in more this month.

Or you can just toss a tip into the tip jar with a single donation at PayPal. Either way, your support keeps me going at these crazy posts.

And thanks.

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New Online Workshop: DISCOVERABILITY

New Online Workshop: Discoverability

Discoverability: An online workshop to help your books get found.

In other words, this is the workshop you need to take when you are all done writing and your book is either coming out indie or traditional. How do you get your work into reader’s awareness?

The buzz phrase now for publishing is “glut.” Traditional agents and publishers and editors toss that out all the time to try to jab at indie writers, even though traditional publishers are pouring more and more books into the world than ever before.

So if you really believe that “glut” silliness, then you really, really need this workshop to lift your books above that glut.

In this new world of publishing, there is the fear that far too much crap is being produced. The key with that is as Kris says in her book Discoverability. She says, “One person’s crap is another person’s beloved book.”

Yup. But what can you do to get your book out there so that readers who love it will find it? That has always been the question in publishing and this new world is no different.

However, in this new world, writers are in control of this part of the business for the most part and now have a thousand choices to make on helping their books get found. And sometimes those choices vary from book to book.

You can do passive marketing such as pricing and branding covers and active blurbs, things that need to be done right no matter what else you do.

But how much time do you want to spend on websites, blogs, social media, and going after reviews for your books? And how to do all that effectively so that the marketing time does not eat into your writing time?

SOME AREAS TO BE COVERED

— How do you use the word “free” to help you sell books and make more money?

— When do you hire help and do it in a way you can afford? And what kind of help?

— An entire lecture on reviews will be included as an added bonus in this workshop. What is the value of reviews and how to get them will be in the lecture.

— Brick-and-mortar store value to your books. How to market to the brick and mortar stores, and when to spend the time and when not to.

— Reader discoverability. How do you get it? When and how do you use a site like Bookbub? Or when are bundles great?

— Discounting for sales. How to do it in a sane way.

— Pricing and the power and costs of pricing changes in general.

— Funneling, which is a buzz word used by indies that means to funnel readers into your series by discounting in some fashion your first book. How to do it effectively.

— Value of short fiction to your sales.

— What is the value of selling some work to traditional publishers?

— Advertising. How, when, why, and a bunch of why not. Publishing has always been an odd place for advertising. It can work, it often doesn’t. All that explained.

— Mailing lists, their value to your core fans, their value to word of mouth. How to do them and not spend a vast amount of time at it and how to do them correctly without annoying your fans.

— Kris’s book Discoverability will be added reading in this workshop and will be given to you free as part of the workshop, but the workshop will go far, far, far beyond what she was able to do in that wonderful book.

— Branding. To author, to genre, to topic. What can you do for who you are as a writer? And the time you have to spend?

— Tags and key words and how to use them effectively on all the major sales sites.

— The value of bestseller lists, the value of tracking your own book sales, and how to do it in a way that helps you.

— Understanding the three different times to promote: Before, at publication, and after. What can be done in each phase.

— Value of pre-orders on sales and word of mouth.

— Value of back matter and front matter and links in books.

— How to measure success. We will help you understand what success is and calibrate it for your own goals.

And more… much more. Allyson at WMG Publishing and other professional writers who are making their living at this have helped Kris and me put this all together into a package that will be useful into the future.

The point of this workshop is to give each writer choices in marketing. One choice for one writer might be perfect and work while the same choice for another writer would hurt their writing and not be who they are as a writer.

And one choice for one book would suck as a choice for the very next book. You, as a publisher, a marketer, need to know when to do marketing, what kind works for that book, and when not to and instead just go back and write the next book.

Every writer, every book, and every publishing business is different. The point of this workshop is to show you as much information as we can to help you make your choices instead of just following the most recent fad.

Workshop is limited to 12 writers in February and 12 writers in March. Sign up instructions under the Online Workshop tab above.

Outside of the craft workshops that help you write better stories, this may be the best workshop we will do. It’s taken a village and a lot of time to put it together, that’s for sure.

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Writing in Public: Year 2, Month 6, Day 19

Year 2, Month 6, Day 19 of this Writing in Public challenge.

As I had a hunch might happen today as I got back to normal, workshop stuff and Smith’s Monthly stuff killed any hope of writing tonight. But that’s all right. I’ll be back strong at the writing tomorrow night.

And back to the old format of these posts tonight.

Day started fairly early, meaning around noon for me. I worked on the coast workshop stuff until almost 3 p.m. plus some e-mail. Then headed off to our store, then to a deli in a grocery store for some lunch, then to WMG Publishing.

Talked with the fine folks there for a time, then went to work on formatting Smith’s Monthly. Then home for a nap with the white cat around 6:30 p.m.

In here around 9 p.m. after the nap, dinner, news, and dishes.

I worked for about two hours on workshop stuff, then took a nap again, (very tired) and then went and watched some television. Back in here around 1:30 a.m. and worked until about 3 a.m. on the final workshop stuff for the week.

Then I spent the next hour or so fixing the schedule for the February workshops. It is now after 5 a.m.

Topic of the Night: New workshop: Discoverability

You will note that a new workshop is on the list for February and March called Discoverability.

I will give full details on the workshop tomorrow. But tonight I can say this. It will have a free “Reviews” lecture as part of it and also a free electronic copy of Kris’s Discoverability book as side reading in the course.

(Thanks folks for the feedback on the reviews topic. Pushed us to put it as a lecture and include the lecture in the new workshop as side learning. Reviews lecture will be available later in the week for those who don’t want to sign up for the Discoverability workshop right away.)

How to get your books discovered by readers is a huge topic. And we won’t just cover things that Kris and I or WMG Publishing do, but as much as we have learned about from hundreds of writers.

This workshop will also be good for those of you who are going the traditional route or with small presses to help your books sell more. But the focus will be aimed at indie writers and how to improve book sales and flatly get more readers and more money in the process.

This workshop goes as a partner with Making a Living and Productivity workshops. (You can take them in any order.)

So notice how we do this? Making a Living, Productivity, and Discoverability workshops all go together. Depth, Character Voice, and Pacing workshops go together on the craft side. (You can take those in any order as well, but we suggest the Depth first if you can.)

Note that there is two weeks to sign up for the February workshops before they start. There is room in all workshops, so no issue there.

So full description tomorrow night on Discoverability workshop, but I am taking sign-ups now if you want to jump in and help your book sales going forward.

Back to fiction writing for me tomorrow night. On what, I have no idea. But it was a fun rest period away from some standard patterns and work days. Broken schedule is good sometimes. (grin)

——–

Totals For Year 2, Month 6, Day 19

— Daily Fiction: 00 original words. Fiction month-to-date: 35,900 words  

— Nonfiction: 00 new words. Nonfiction month-to-date total: 2,500 words

— Blog Posts: 600 new words. Blog month-to-date word count: 11,550 words

— E-mail: 41 e-mails. Approx. 1,500 original words.  E-mails month-to date: 647 e-mails. Approx.14,400 words

— Covers Designed and Finished: 0. Covers finished month-to-date: 1 Covers

For projects finished in the first year and links to the posts, click on the Writing in Public tab above.

For projects finished this month and where you can read them, click continue reading below.

You can support this ongoing blog at Patreon on a monthly basis. Not per post. Just click on the Patreon image. Extra stuff for different levels of support and I will be adding in more this month.

Or you can just toss a tip into the tip jar with a single donation at PayPal. Either way, your support keeps me going at these crazy posts.

And thanks.

Oo4th_patreon_name


Tip Jar

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Writing in Public: Year 2, Month 6, Day 18

Year 2, Month 6, Day 18 of this Writing in Public challenge.

Up way early today for me once again, and again spent most of the day in information gathering mode. Same as the last couple of days.

And I listened to and watched some football. And I had lunch with a bunch of writers as normal on Sunday.

So tomorrow I’ll be back to detailing out each day a little more in the old format, and back writing. No clue what I am going to write next, but I’ll figure that out tomorrow night. (grin)

Thanks also for the comments (both in the comments and private e-mails) on the idea of a workshop on all the aspects of reviews. Most of you commented on the ARC stuff, which is only a minor part of reviews and the problems writers face with reviews in this modern world.

We covered ARCs in a minor way in one week of the Promotions workshop. We do not do that workshop anymore because it dated quickly.

And I want to be clear here (which I clearly was not in the past). I think some reviews have value and others don’t hurt you.

And I think going after major national reviews, in some instances, has value. But not all the time or with every book.

And I think that reader reviews are not valid to go after. However, reader reviews can have value to a writer in some cases. But for a writer to try to get reader reviews, for the most part, is just damn silly. Readers are going to do what readers want to do.

As I have said over and over and over, I do not think writers should read their own reviews.

But I do believe writers can use pull quotes from reviews as ad copy on their book covers in some instances. Or inside front pages.

If you don’t understand how you can use a pull quote without reading the review, maybe I really do need to do the review workshop.

Part of the workshop I was thinking about was tricks to recovering from reading a good or a bad review and getting back to writing. Yes, reading a good review can stop you as solidly as reading a bad review. If you haven’t experienced that yet, you will.

So thanks for the feedback on the idea of a review workshop. I doubt we will do it.

Tomorrow this will come back to the format I have been following for the last year plus. And I’ll get back to writing.

——–

Totals For Year 2, Month 6, Day 18

— Daily Fiction: 00 original words. Fiction month-to-date: 35,900 words  

— Nonfiction: 00 new words. Nonfiction month-to-date total: 2,500 words

— Blog Posts: 500 new words. Blog month-to-date word count: 10,950 words

— E-mail: 57 e-mails. Approx. 1,200 original words.  E-mails month-to date: 606 e-mails. Approx.12,900 words

— Covers Designed and Finished: 0. Covers finished month-to-date: 1 Covers

For projects finished in the first year and links to the posts, click on the Writing in Public tab above.

For projects finished this month and where you can read them, click continue reading below.

You can support this ongoing blog at Patreon on a monthly basis. Not per post. Just click on the Patreon image. Extra stuff for different levels of support and I will be adding in more this month.

Or you can just toss a tip into the tip jar with a single donation at PayPal. Either way, your support keeps me going at these crazy posts.

And thanks.

Oo4th_patreon_name


Tip Jar

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Writing in Public: Year 2, Month 6, Day 17

Year 2, Month 6, Day 17 of this Writing in Public challenge.

Up way early today for me once againg, and again spent most of the day in information gathering mode. Same as the last couple of days.

And I managed to work on a new workshop that is clear to both Kris and I that we need to try to tackle. That took a lot longer than expected.

And had a great dinner with a couple of old friends. And as expected, I did no writing tonight. Back at that on Sunday or Monday. Chances are Monday because tomorrow (Sunday) I have a ton of things to do with workshops and such.

Also, if you sent in an assignment and didn’t get the “got it” e-mail, don’t panic. One of my e-mail hosts is having a glitch and my other e-mail host does not talk to things like Hotmail or Embark or other Microscoft based e-mail addresses. But the other host that does talk with them will be up again on Sunday. No worries.

Topic of the Night: 

Last night I did a fairly long topic on the value of doing collections and how to look at them and see if they are right for you.

So for tonight I think I’ll just suggest that if you didn’t read that one, read it. It might make a good basic lecture on collections.

And a question in general. I started jotting down all the different aspects about reviews in general. Turns out there are a ton of different sides to reviews. The problems that come with reading your own reviews to the value of some reviews over others (say the value of an Amazon review and how it helps to the value of a Publisher’s Weekly review and how it helps.) How to go after reviews in a sane manner that does not hurt your work or spend your time. For example, we sent out on a recent novel from WMG Publishing over 30 paper ARCs (Advanced Review Copies) and another 50 electronic ARC packages. Also there are reader review sites all over the place such as Goodreads and book blogger sites.

And on and on. Layers and layers of things to understand about reviews at all levels, including the personal level and where and how to use them correctly on your books and even how to do pull quotes from reviews.

So my question is this. Any interest out there on a workshop on all this massive amount of stuff about reviews? I have talked to a lot of indie writers who are hurting their own sales by going about getting reviews wrong, or writers who have stopped writing for weeks or longer because of getting a bad review. There are ways past that problem.

And it is stunning how few indie writers even know what an ARC is or where to send them. For one obvious example: your local paper. And what to include with the ARC. We touched slightly on ARCs in the promotions workshop, which we are no longer doing because it got outdated.

Also, for many indie writers, doing ARCs might not be a good idea. I don’t do them for any of my books at this point, but WMG did it for my novel Dead Money a year ago.

So any interest in all that in a workshop and so much more? That is not the workshop idea Kris and I are putting together. This is something different I am wondering about is all.

Wow, there is so much stuff about reviews in publishing, it took me a ton of writing just to ask about it. (grin)

——–

 

Totals For Year 2, Month 6, Day 17

— Daily Fiction: 00 original words. Fiction month-to-date: 35,900 words  

— Nonfiction: 00 new words. Nonfiction month-to-date total: 2,500 words

— Blog Posts: 700 new words. Blog month-to-date word count: 10,450 words

— E-mail: 17 e-mails. Approx. 300 original words.  E-mails month-to date: 549 e-mails. Approx.11,700 words

— Covers Designed and Finished: 0. Covers finished month-to-date: 1 Covers

For projects finished in the first year and links to the posts, click on the Writing in Public tab above.

For projects finished this month and where you can read them, click continue reading below.

You can support this ongoing blog at Patreon on a monthly basis. Not per post. Just click on the Patreon image. Extra stuff for different levels of support and I will be adding in more this month.

Or you can just toss a tip into the tip jar with a single donation at PayPal. Either way, your support keeps me going at these crazy posts.

And thanks.

Oo4th_patreon_name


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Writing in Public, Year 2, Month 6, Day 16

Year 2, Month 6, Day 16 of this Writing in Public challenge.

Up way early today for me once againg, and again spent most of the day in information gathering mode.

And I managed to put together five story collections. That took a lot longer than expected.

And as expected, I did no writing tonight. Back at that on Sunday or Monday.

Topic of the Night: Collections

As I am putting new collections together of some of my short fiction, a number of questions come up. Logical questions.

First off, are they worth the time and energy in this new world of indie publishing?

That answer is simple: Of course they are. They are a different book, a different title with it’s own set of cash streams. And it’s a title that could introduce a reader to your work.  More titles, the more paths of discoverability that a reader can find your work.

And harking back to a topic a few nights back, they have their own return on investment that can trickle money into the river of money that will head your way.

Second question: Do they sell well?

Answer is also simple: Of course not. If you are doing a short story collection with visions of selling a few thousand copies in a month, you really need a vision adjustment. Traditional publishing hates single author collections because they don’t sell that well.

But they do sell some. And they help with discoverability. So if your perspective is in place and you are not looking for the next home run in cash and sales, and you love short fiction and writing it, then collections are an obvious choice.

Third Question: Are they worth the WIBBOW test. In other words, would you be better off writing than doing a collection?

Answer: My opinion, if you are looking for fast money, you would be better off writing novels in a series. But if you love short fiction and already have some written and selling out there, and are fine with the long term return, then yes, do some.

But every writer is different on this point.

Fourth Question: Pricing?

Well, the answer again depends. If you discount all your short fiction out at 99 cents or less, then a five story collection really couldn’t be much over $2.99 to give the reader value.

But I price most of my short stories at $2.99 electronic and $4.99 paper. So five of them if the reader bought them seperately is $14.95 electronic. I’m not going to do that in electronic, of course, but I think $5.99 or $6.99 for a five story collection would be good value for the reader.

Right now I have eight collections up that are very old (2011 or so) and they are priced at $2.99. Those are coming down in the next month or so. And I will repackaged the collections into newer collections.

So what you charge for a collection is up to you.

Fifth Question: How to figure return on investment on the collection itself?

Stories are already written, so content has no time involved, since that ROI is being calculated on the story itself. But I would suggest that you figure $50.00 per story, a pretty standard reprint rate for a short story.

So for five stories you have $250 cost of story. (Remember to credit that $50 to each individual story ROI calculation.) Art is $20.00. Layout and cover design time is maybe 3 hours and at my rate of $50.00 that’s $150.00 and another half hour or so to put them all up in all the places.

Total cost is about $550 so add $50 for misc to make the math work easy and you have a $600 investment in a collection.

10% return on investment in a year would be $60.00.  I sell my collections say at $5.99 so I get $4.00 per sale in all platforms around the world.

I need to sell 15 copies total across all outlets and including paper IN A YEAR to make a 10% return on investment.

Yeah, my collections can do that.

Of course, this kind of thinking makes all the get-rich-quick writers crazy. But for those of us who want to still be writing in thirty years and having our writing support us solidly, without chasing every little trend, then a 10% return on investment is a very solid and logical business approach.

In the first 16 issues of Smith’s Monthly I have published just about 70 short stories.

70 divided by 5 = 14 collections x $60.00 per year = $840 per year every year. And that’s if it only sells 15 copies per year.

Say just for kicks that my collections each sold, on average 5 copies per month which would be 60 per year x $4 each sale = $240 per collection per year x 14 collections from the first 16 issues of Smith’s Monthly = $3,360 per year.

And that’s only selling 60 per year across all sites. You know, numbers so low, it would never be within a million clicks of a bestseller list.

But I like looking at the 10% return on investment and not thinking about sales going higher. If they do, great.

So are collections worth it? I sure think so.

And since I have written hundreds of short stories and still write them, I can see no limit to the ceiling on what can be made with collections in this new world.

But before you go jumping into collections, think it through. Do you love and write a lot of short fiction? Or do you write so little, you would be better served to use the short story or a possible collection as a form of loss leader for your novels?

No right answer and collections are not a get-rich-by-running-to-the-money plan. If you are in a hurry with your writing, skip collections. You won’t be happy with them.

But if you love short fiction and are working to build a solid writing career, collections might be just another cash stream to consider.

——–

 

Totals For Year 2, Month 6, Day 15

— Daily Fiction: 00 original words. Fiction month-to-date: 35,900 words  

— Nonfiction: 00 new words. Nonfiction month-to-date total: 2,500 words

— Blog Posts: 1,100 new words. Blog month-to-date word count: 9,750 words

— E-mail: 7 e-mails. Approx. 100 original words. (The lowest ever since doing this daily blog… wow…) E-mails month-to date: 532 e-mails. Approx.11,400 words

— Covers Designed and Finished: 0. Covers finished month-to-date: 1 Covers

For projects finished in the first year and links to the posts, click on the Writing in Public tab above.

For projects finished this month and where you can read them, click continue reading below.

You can support this ongoing blog at Patreon on a monthly basis. Not per post. Just click on the Patreon image. Extra stuff for different levels of support and I will be adding in more this month.

Or you can just toss a tip into the tip jar with a single donation at PayPal. Either way, your support keeps me going at these crazy posts.

And thanks.

Oo4th_patreon_name


Tip Jar

Continue reading

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Writing In Public: Year 2, Month 6 Day 15

Year 2, Month 6, Day 15 of this Writing in Public challenge.

As I said the last few nights, for the next couple of days, I’m going to continue to do this sort of post to give myself a break, but yet continue the blog. But not a break from writing, just a break from doing these hour-by-hour blogs so I can focus on some other stuff this week.

So as I said last night, I will still report in on writing stuff, no worries. And the other format will be back in a few days.

Up way early today for me and spent most of the day in information gathering mode. Not sure why, but I am focused on doing some more Poker Boy stories and a new Poker Boy novel or two, so weirdly for me I ended up in a bar listening to a band because a new character in the Poker Boy universe is a singer in a band.

And I started to work on putting some short story collections together of stories in general. That will be fun getting some of those out.

Topic of the Night: Feeding the Machine

I have a hunch I will do a number of topics on this one, but wanted to get it started here. We have all heard cliches about how writers need to get out and live to be able to write. Well, maybe, maybe not.

The most silly of these comes from idiots who wonder how a man can write a woman’s point of view or a woman can write a man’s point of view. Just stupid.

And there are indiots who think writers need to go and see something, like a setting, before they can really write about it. I wrote an entire novel for Random House set in Northern Thailand, a place I would NEVER travel to. I wrote the setting from descriptions and a few pictures in guidebooks and a great imagination of what it would feel like if I was there. The editor and the reviewers all thought it was the richest setting book they had seen in a long time.

Called “Depth” of writing, for those of you wondering how that is done, and I teach a workshop on that.

But one thing going out and experiencing stuff does help is seeing things you wouldn’t know even existed. Kris does heavy research on her Nelscott novels because she was barely alive in the 1960s and she wants to make sure the details are right. Those novels are acclaimed for their detail and accuracy by people who lived where she is writing about.

Where all the “I got to experience it to write about it” silliness really breaks down is either western or science fiction or mystery genres. You don’t have to kill someone to write about it, you don’t have to meet an alien to write about an alien on another planet, and you didn’t have to live in the old west to write westerns.

So I never worry about that. I have a character I’m putting into a new Poker Boy novel who is a back-up singer in a bar band. I don’t need to play in a band to understand her point of view. But since I had the chance tonight, it was fun to watch from a distance, sitting at a bar, drinking Diet Coke, and scratching down some notes on a note pad.

And since Poker Boy is basically me in wishfulfilment mode (yes I wish I could stop time and teleport), I might just open the novel with Poker Boy sitting where I was sitting tonight, watching the band and the back-up singer.

Who knows, maybe this will be the first line of the novel:

The bar was too small for the quality of the band.

——–

Totals For Year 2, Month 6, Day 15

— Daily Fiction: 00 original words. Fiction month-to-date: 35,900 words  

— Nonfiction: 00 new words. Nonfiction month-to-date total: 2,500 words

— Blog Posts: 700 new words. Blog month-to-date word count: 8,650 words

— E-mail: 11 e-mails. Approx. 200 original words. E-mails month-to date: 525 e-mails. Approx.11,300 words

— Covers Designed and Finished: 0. Covers finished month-to-date: 1 Covers

For projects finished in the first year and links to the posts, click on the Writing in Public tab above.

For projects finished this month and where you can read them, click continue reading below.

You can support this ongoing blog at Patreon on a monthly basis. Not per post. Just click on the Patreon image. Extra stuff for different levels of support and I will be adding in more this month.

Or you can just toss a tip into the tip jar with a single donation at PayPal. Either way, your support keeps me going at these crazy posts.

And thanks.

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Writing in Public: Year 2, Month 6, Day 14

Year 2, Month 6, Day 14 of this Writing in Public challenge.

As I said last night, for the next four days, I’m going to continue to do this sort of post to give myself a break, but yet continue the blog. But not a break from writing, just a break from doing these hour-by-hour blogs so I can focus on some other stuff this week.

So as I said last night, I will still report in on writing stuff, no worries. And the other format will be back in a few days.

Today I was up early and running all over town and then headed into the valley for a while and spent some time just watching people.

One of things I am trying to do is get the poetry brain back going again, looking at situations with a poetry observation eye. I have published two or three poems in Smith’s Monthly every issue and figure it’s time to put in some new ones instead of poems I wrote back in the 1970s.

So ended the day having a great dinner with a friend I have known for 50 years. Great conversation. Great focus today on the poetry. Good day, but up so early this morning for all the stuff I needed to do, I’m crashing way early.

Topic of the Night: Repeat of the Announcement from last night because I want it out there and I’m too tired to do a new topic tonight.

The Anniversary Day Saga is basically one story that covers eight novels. Sure, there are other stories in the books and each book is satisfying yet leaves you wanting more.

Anniversary DayBlowbackMurder of Clones

The first novel, Anniversary Day has been out now for some time. It was about a bombing on the moon. Second book has also been out for a while. It’s title is Blowback.

But Kris wrote the rest of the story over a year plus in time and it turned out to be six more books, making the Anniversary Day Saga eight novels long.

All are finished and the last six will come out one per month starting today with A Murder of Clones.

I have read it all and this may be one of the greatest science fiction series of books ever done. And I am not just saying that because she is my wife. She drove me crazy taking months to write each book. You all get to read them one per month.

So don’t miss this series. This is Kristine Kathryn Rusch at the top of her form. And a series that will keep you reading into all hours of the night.

——–

Totals For Year 2, Month 6, Day 14

— Daily Fiction: 00 original words. Fiction month-to-date: 35,900 words  

— Nonfiction: 00 new words. Nonfiction month-to-date total: 2,500 words

— Blog Posts: 500 new words. Blog month-to-date word count: 8,650 words

— E-mail: 13 e-mails. Approx. 400 original words. E-mails month-to date: 514 e-mails. Approx.11,100 words

— Covers Designed and Finished: 0. Covers finished month-to-date: 1 Covers

For projects finished in the first year and links to the posts, click on the Writing in Public tab above.

For projects finished this month and where you can read them, click continue reading below.

You can support this ongoing blog at Patreon on a monthly basis. Not per post. Just click on the Patreon image. Extra stuff for different levels of support and I will be adding in more this month.

Or you can just toss a tip into the tip jar with a single donation at PayPal. Either way, your support keeps me going at these crazy posts.

And thanks.

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Writing in Public: Year 2, Month 6, Day 13

Year 2, Month 6, Day 13 of this Writing in Public challenge.

Got off to a very late start today because I just slept in. So by the time I got done with running around to banks, snail mail, and back to WMG Publishing, I skipped lunch and went right to dinner after a nap with the white cat. Yup, slept that late.

Tonight was more projects getting done. For example, besides watching television, I put together Smith’s Monthly #16 and got it turned in for proofting.

And I went up to WMG Publishing between ten and midnight and worked on cleaning up my desk there with a couple of projects that I had gotten behind on.

And then off to the grocery store around midnight to get some snacks and such.

And I walked for a half hour today as well.

So it was a goofy, just-off day.

Actually, for the next four days, I’m going to continue to do this sort of post to give myself a break, but yet continue the blog. But not a break from writing, just a break from doing these hour-by-hour blogs so I can focus on some other stuff this week.

So I will still report in on writing stuff, no worries. And the other format will be back in a few days.

Topic of the Night: An Announcement!

I was going to talk a little more about some of the crazy responses I got to the thinking of writing as an investment.

By the way, that example I used was not my bestselling book last year by a long, long ways. Some of you assumed that. I just used that because it just came out a few months ago is all, and I remember the hours of writing it took. (grin)

And even if you are selling a thousand copies a day or 1 copy per month, those calculations can work for you to give you a real-world measurement of your success or your progress. Not sure why a few people thought it was either/or.

So I was going to talk about that and I might over the next few nights at one point. But instead I wanted to really point all you science fiction and mystery fans to Kris’s new book that was just published today.

The Anniversary Day Saga is basically one story that covers eight novels. Sure, there are other stories in the books and each book is satisfying yet leaves you wanting more.

Anniversary DayBlowbackMurder of Clones

The first novel, Anniversary Day has been out now for some time. It was about a bombing on the moon. Second book has also been out for a while. It’s title is Blowback.

But Kris wrote the rest of the story over a year plus in time and it turned out to be six more books, making the Anniversary Day Saga eight novels long.

All are finished and the last six will come out one per month starting today with A Murder of Clones.

I have read it all and this may be one of the greatest science fiction series of books ever done. And I am not just saying that because she is my wife. She drove me crazy taking months to write each book. You all get to read them one per month.

So don’t miss this series. This is Kristine Kathryn Rusch at the top of her form. And a series that will keep you reading into all hours of the night.

——–

Totals For Year 2, Month 6, Day 13

— Daily Fiction: 00 original words. Fiction month-to-date: 35,900 words  

— Nonfiction: 00 new words. Nonfiction month-to-date total: 2,500 words

— Blog Posts: 700 new words. Blog month-to-date word count: 8,150 words

— E-mail: 13 e-mails. Approx. 400 original words. E-mails month-to date: 501 e-mails. Approx.10,700 words

— Covers Designed and Finished: 0. Covers finished month-to-date: 1 Covers

For projects finished in the first year and links to the posts, click on the Writing in Public tab above.

For projects finished this month and where you can read them, click continue reading below.

You can support this ongoing blog at Patreon on a monthly basis. Not per post. Just click on the Patreon image. Extra stuff for different levels of support and I will be adding in more this month.

Or you can just toss a tip into the tip jar with a single donation at PayPal. Either way, your support keeps me going at these crazy posts.

And thanks.

Oo4th_patreon_name


Tip Jar

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Writing in Public: Year 2, Month 6, Day 12

Year 2, Month 6, Day 12 of this Writing in Public challenge.

Sort of a strange Monday, so this will be a strange blog. Well, stranger than normal, anyway.

Banks and mail and all that standard stuff this afternoon, working up at WMG Publishing and so on. Standard Monday drill.

Home at 5 p.m. to watch the National Championship college game. Ducks just played sloppy and didn’t really make it a game, which was sad. Ahh, well. Four hours gone there.

Up here in this office around 9 p.m. and did workshop stuff, getting it all done for the week tonight by working, with a break to watch television, up until 2 a.m. But done for the week.

Then I went back to putting Smith’s Monthly #16 together, got most of that done, wrote the 600 word introduction, and did some other clean-up work here until around 5 a.m., plus some laundry and basic stuff.

Kris read and liked the book I had just finished, not noticing where I cut, which was good. (Success!! And when I told her later what I had cut, she agreed that didn’t belong in this book.)

And she had some wonderful comments on how to make the ending a little more powerful. I am going to take her suggestions in a couple of weeks or so when I get the book ready to put into Smith’s Monthly #17. Thanks, Kris!

For the next week, I’m going to be working on stuff I have let slide, so the posts for the rest of this week will be odd at times. And I’ve got three short story assignments due, so going to give those some focus as well.

And weirdly enough, it’s the middle of the month already and the February online workshops start in early February, so if anyone is thinking about those, it’s time to get signed up. There are openings in all ten workshops.

Topic of the Night: Return on Investment.

Not a long topic tonight, but sort of continuing with the mall example last night. A number of people wrote me and didn’t understand how to figure a return on investment for a copyright.

So let me give you an example tonight, continuing the topic from last night, and then head to bed. Each of you need to figure it with your own costs.

The problem is that most couldn’t figure their own investment value. So here is how I do it with a novel of my own.

Example:

Fact One… I charge myself for my time $50.00 per hour. I have said that before.

Fact Two… To write the Christmas novel Heaven Painted as a Christmas Gift took me about 40 hours total. (That’s to get final copy to the proofer.)

(I sold the novel in a contract to WMG Publishing, but let’s just pretend for the moment I indie published it as it was published, and that I paid contract help for the help I got at WMG Publishing… Just for the sake of this example. WMG Publishing actual return on investment uses very different figures.)

Fact Three… Art cost $35.00 for the book.

Fact Four… I put the novel in an issue of Smith’s Monthly. I did the layout and put the issue up, so another 10 hours of work for me there on the novel part of the issue.

Fact Five… I hired the cover and layout of the stand alone novel done. $400 costs. (Again, just using general because actually WMG Publishing did all this.)

Fact Six… Proofing was hired done, so another $200 there.

Fact Seven… Misc costs of proof copies and such were around $50.00 (less, but let me use that.)

So total costs for the book were $2,000 (writing time) + $35.00 (art) + $500 (my layout time) + $650 (layout, proofing, and misc costs.) = $3,185.00

So round that to $3,200.00  ($2,500 my time at $50 per hour.)

So for one year, to make a 10% return on investment on that $3,200, I need to earn from the novel $320.00.

One year income of $320 = 10% Return On Investment on that one copyright.

How is the book doing in only being out for two months of the year so far?

Stunningly well, actually. It was in a Christmas bundle that sold a lot of copies, plus its part of Smith’s Monthly makes great money (sales and subscriptions), plus about 50 or so direct sales that I know about at full price out there on the various sites. (That number is low.)

I can safely say that the novel has earned over a 100% return on investment in the first year of publication, with ten months of the first year left for it to continue selling. A total success.

Now starting next December, that number resets. I would like the book to earn 10% for the second year of its investment. Which means it needs to make me (over all sources) $320 to do that.

About 80 electronic sales, just looking at that one form. That means to hit that return on investment the book would need to sell about 7 electronic copies per month across dozens of bookstores and around the world.

Add in audio and the paper and sales of back issues of Smith’s Monthly and that gets very easy to hit $320 per year return on investment on that copyright.

——–

Totals For Year 2, Month 6, Day 12

— Daily Fiction: 00 original words. Fiction month-to-date: 35,900 words  

— Nonfiction: 600 new words. Nonfiction month-to-date total: 2,500 words

— Blog Posts: 1,000 new words. Blog month-to-date word count: 7,450 words

— E-mail: 29 e-mails. Approx. 1,100 original words. E-mails month-to date: 488 e-mails. Approx.10,300 words

— Covers Designed and Finished: 0. Covers finished month-to-date: 1 Covers

For projects finished in the first year and links to the posts, click on the Writing in Public tab above.

For projects finished this month and where you can read them, click continue reading below.

You can support this ongoing blog at Patreon on a monthly basis. Not per post. Just click on the Patreon image. Extra stuff for different levels of support and I will be adding in more this month.

Or you can just toss a tip into the tip jar with a single donation at PayPal. Either way, your support keeps me going at these crazy posts.

And thanks.

Oo4th_patreon_name


Tip Jar

Continue reading

Posted in Challenge, On Writing, publishing, Topic of the Night, Writing in Public | Tagged , , , , | 9 Comments